Tuesday, December 06, 2016

This isn't my London

This is London by Ben Judah
Picador 2016
It's not all so bad: reproduced from https://www.flickr.com/photos/dgeezer/6141438138
I wanted to like Ben Judah’s This Is London, and certainly it’s a book which will stick with me for a long time. Partly undercover, partly through interviews, Judah investigates the hidden lives of migrant London. The haunting beginning sees him spending the dawn hours at Victoria Coach Station, ‘our miserable Ellis Island’, as the buses arrive from across Europe bringing new people to stay and work in the UK’s capital. In the chill grey rain, he follows a group of Roma people until he finds someone who will speak with him. His dedication cannot be understated, and at times, such as when he interviews the addict sex workers of Ilford Lane about the murder of one of their number, I was overwhelmed by his bravery and his honesty.

Judah reports faithfully on the homeless, the destitute, the beggars and addicts and jobseekers of the four corners of the city, from Barking to Shepherd’s Bush, Kensington to Peckham. A sociologist or anthropologist would be horrified by his style: he neither reveals his methods nor investigates his own motivation, after a short and troubling introduction:

I was born in London but I no longer recognise this city. I don’t know if I love the new London or if it frightens me: a city where at least 55 per cent of the people are not ethnically white British, nearly 40 per cent were born abroad, and 5 per cent are living illegally in the shadows. [1]

Monday, June 13, 2016

Drancy: this is not somewhere people choose to be.

Yesterday I went with a friend to Drancy, a Paris banlieue about half an hour from the Gare du Nord to the North-East. Drancy didn't seem to have that much going for it. In the rain, newer and older blocks of social housing, a copy-and-paste French mairie, a street market which seemed busy. We walked around and my friend, an expert in urban planning, told me about the different blocks, some pebble-dashed, some newer ones with bold curves and cheerful two-tone paint. At the end of a block in the main square was a billboard advertising new flats to come. Another, cheerless building reminiscent of lower-budget new build flats in East London was advertised with a drooping banner: 'Dernières Opportunités'. Between run-down businesses were small pavilons, modern and older detached cottages with small, floral gardens. 
Drancy Town Centre with statue of Charles de Gaulle


Tuesday, May 31, 2016

A month in Athens

I'm going to Athens for a month in July, to help build a social centre for migrants in the city, to work with around 30 colleagues and comrades from the university, and to attend a conference on the 'refugee crisis' on the island of Lesvos. There are 15,000 migrants currently stuck in the Greek capital and there's no infrastructure to help them. The government's attitude is rapidly changing and many are being forced into improvised prison camps without even running water or electricity.

We're paying our own fares, but we need to raise some money for general operations while we're there. If you have any extra money lying around, please consider putting a bit into our crowdfunding. Any extra will be given as direct aid. Thanks!

https://crowdfunding.justgiving.com/SoasGoestoathensandbeyond